The Shape of Everything
A website mostly about Mac stuff, written by Gus Mueller
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January 14, 2003
(This post is from my old, old, super old site. My views have changed over the years, hopefully my writing has improved, and there is now more than a handful of folks reading my site. Enjoy.)

And in one of those weird coincidences, Cafe au Lait has the following java quote for the day, which I'll just reprint because it doesn't have archives for the quotes... (well, it does... but it lumps the whole year on one page...)

"because you can program well or poorly, and because most of it is creative (in that we don't really know what we're doing when we start out), my view is that we should train developers the way we train creative people like poets and artists. People may say,"Well, that sounds really nuts." But what do people do when they're being trained, for example, to get a Master of Fine Arts in poetry? They study great works of poetry. Do we do that in our software engineering disciplines? No. You don't look at the source code for great pieces of software. Or look at the architecture of great pieces of software. You don't look at their design. You don't study the lives of great software designers. So, you don't study the literature of the thing you're trying to build. "

--Richard Gabriel, Distinguished Engineer at Sun Microsystems Read the rest in The Poetry of Programming